Jalie 2320 gray linen trucker jacket – Part II

Now on to the fun part – assembling the fronts and installing the welt pockets.

First, I joined the three front panels in a standard 5/8” seam and pressed the seams open and then away from the center panel.

Next, I trimmed the under seam down to a scant 1/4” and then folded the top seam allowance over it and edge stitched to make a mock flat felled seam – less bulky in this heavy fabric than a traditional flat felled seam. I have also bound these seam allowances in really heavy fabrics like velveteen.

Next, the pocket facing is applied. To reduce bulk, I used a firmly woven cotton. I generally use Symphony broadcloth but I wasn’t able to find the right color. I serged around three sides but it’s only necessary to finish the bottom edge because the sides will be finished off by the pocket anyway. Stitch, trim, clip into the corners, turn and edge stitch.

The pocket edges are turned under 3/8 and then applied to the wrong side of the garment and topstitched into place.

I need to make buttonholes in the pocket flaps yet but you get the idea.

Now, onto the welt pockets. First, lay you pocket piece face up onto the right side of the garment. I like to clearly mark my stitching lines with a chalk pencil.

I have also added a piece of very lightweight fusible interfacing to the wrong side of the jacket front. I like to do this anytime I add a welt pocket. I’ve pinked the edges to prevent any show-through on the right side.

Then I stitch around the box, using a stitch length of 2 on the long sides, with smaller stitches around the corners. It’s a good idea to begin your stitching on one of the long sides to avoid thread buildup in one of the corners.

Then, cut down the center of the box and into the corners. Turn to the inside of the front and press.

If your corners are not perfect, it’s okay because this pocket will have a bartack across the top and bottom of the welt which will hide any imperfections. If you are scared of welt pockets, this one is for you.

Next, fold back the straight edge of the pocket back over the opening and press well. Turn it back again towards the front edge, forming your welt. Fold the garment back from the welt and secure those little triangles. I like to use a few lines of straight stitching here.

Tada!

Then I edgestitch around the top, bottom and front of the welt before laying the pocket lining – again, a firmly woven cotton – on top.

The lining is attached to the pocket with a straight stitch about 1/8” from the edge. No need to be super neat about it since it will be hidden underneath my binding or enclosed in a seam at the front and bottom. You can also just serge them together, if you wish. Now, it’s time for the bartacks. My stitches are very short as I like more of a satin stitch here but you can use a longer length if you prefer.

The finished product!

Next up, I’ll be setting up the binder and buttonhole machine. I’ll be interested to see how this metallic organza works out as a binding.

Parting shot. Cattlianthe Gigi Andrae Louis ‘Maverick’ HCC/AOS. My dear friend Thanh named this beautiful hybrid for me a few years ago and I so wanted to be the first to have it awarded. The orchid gods smiled on me a year ago and awarded this flower an HCC (Highly Commended Certificate). I gave it the clonal name ‘Maverick’ because, of the many blooms of this cross I have seen, it is the only one that is not a deep red.

4 Comments

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4 responses to “Jalie 2320 gray linen trucker jacket – Part II

  1. Kay

    Hi GiGi,
    I want to get a vintage Singer to set up for buttonholes. Is your Rocketeer a model 500? And is the buttonhole attachment the one that came with the machine.
    Thank you for any info because the frustration is real !
    Kay

    • Hi Kay! Yes, my buttonhole machine is a 500A from 1961. The buttonhole attachment was purchased separately. It is the Singer Professional for slant-needle zig zag machines (they are also available for low shank machines). It comes with various templates/cams for straight and keyhole buttonholes. They are about $15 on EBay and very readily available. The trick to getting really gorgeous jacket buttonholes is to stitch around three times. I couldn’t justify an industrial buttonhole machine so this is the next best thing.

  2. Kay

    Thanks Gigi .
    I happened to be going back to find one of your old posts & saw that there were new ones ! Made me happy ! I’ve missed reading what you are working on !